These are strange days — imagine that if Zoom met the $600-a-share price target set by analysts, then it would have a market capitalization that will exceed that of AT&T. While you ponder that, welcome to yet another Friday in the pandemic. It is so hot in San Francisco that I can’t think straight. How is that for an excuse for not writing today? Instead, I am sharing three good reads. 


Who owns the song when AI creates the song? Who owns the music when you use AI to create a song or some art. Tyler Hayes tries to answer the question in this report. [Tyler Hayes] 

The pandemic has proved to be a boon for streaming video services. Limelight Networks, a content delivery network, notes that nearly (47 percent of people worldwide subscribed to a new streaming service in the last six months. An average global viewer is watching almost eight hours (seven hours, 55 minutes) per week. In my previous publication, w named this cord-cutting, and it is one of the many reasons we see the slow death of the Great American Cable Bundle. [Bloomberg]

As a diabetic, I know one fact: no sugar is the only good sugar. However, that doesn’t stop researchers from working on a low-calorie variant of real sugar. This long read in the New Yorker is a brilliant exploration of those efforts. [The New Yorker.]

What remains are the things that cannot be relegated to machines and algorithms, copied from others, or reduced to formulas, directions, and recipes: the artist remains—the singular human individual capable of creative ideas, original thoughts, deep contemplation, and unique expressions of complex ideas, philosophies, and emotions.

Guy Tal