I came across an article about a Rado watch designed by British-born and London-based designer Tej Chauhan. Rado watches are not to my taste. But his approach to design caught my eye.

It combines our visual language with an optimised functional experience; the way we use form, colour, and material to elicit joy in broad audiences. It’s specifically designed to engage people, and to invite interaction.

The PORT Magazine. 1

His comment made me wonder — isn’t (or shouldn’t) all design by emotive and do all the things he aspires in his work. Still, I couldn’t help but notice how his time at Nokia might have influenced his design philosophy. His work has that typical Finnish design appeal — unhurried, non-fussy, functional minimalism.

While you are checking out Tej’s work, I encourage you to listen to this album from a decade ago. Have a great weekend.

March 6, 2021, San Francisco

  1. PORT is a British Magazine, hence British spellings[]

Design isn’t alone in its lack of quality content—the web, by and large, has become a dumping ground for garbage. Most design content has become poor quality, surface-level content marketing that does more damage than good, because it offers over-simplified, misinformed perspectives dressed up as guidance. When the experienced don’t write, grifters step in, feign expertise, and sell it. 

Frank Chimero’s blog

I have been reading Frank’s blog for a very long time. He writes about design, but when extrapolated it applies to the web culture and the Internet as well. When reading his latest post, I couldn’t help but nod my head in agreement. You can replace “design” with “venture capital,” “startups,” “marketing,” “fashion,” or just about anything, and the core message won’t change. More often than not, you will find much of this fluff on Medium or some copy cat version, like Forbes.com. Obviously, you know how I feel about content & marketing.