Idiots & their Zuck’s Hoodie theory

15 thoughts on “Idiots & their Zuck’s Hoodie theory”

  1. Oh god, i remember this exact narrative when Google was going public. Larry & Sergey didn’t bow down to the street and similar questions about their “maturity” and “readiness” were floated. Call me a conspiracy theorist, but these guys sometimes talk down the stock so they can pick it up cheaper once it hits public markets.

    1. I just think most of these guys on WS have a thumb up where sun don’t shine. They are the ones who were tripping over Groupon and guess how that worked out.

  2. Being an entrepreneur is no less than running a multi-party democracy. Where each leg of your chair belong is a party with vested interests. Users, customers, investors and employees are all legs of the big Facebook-chair.

    It is alright to have brought Facebook to this level by celebrating a counter-culture; now that Facebook is more than a product, more than just a privately held company, it is now time for Mark to wear different jackets. One of which is diplomacy. The cool thing to do is to keep the “party” on. If that means buttering few police officers, so be it. I’m not suggesting Mark to change the way he dresses. But he can surely dress to the occasion. My two cents.

  3. I saw this interview just about an hour ago on Bloomberg and have to admit that the analyst should be focusing on other things than the “hoodie.” This 100B is about to go public and all they can focus on his the hoodie? I mean it is what it is.. the man has created a world changing legacy, criticize him for his work (if needed), not his gear… black turtlenecks and sneakers ring a bell?

  4. You know, I still feel best in the clothes I wore in college. If I didn’t need (other people’s permission to make) money, I’d wear jeans, boots, and a T-shirt. However, when we focus on the product he’s brought to market, rather than what makes him comfortable, dress-wise, we improve the dialog, IMO.

  5. Hoodies are pure function, easy to maintain and of great comfort. Ideal for minimizing distracting superficialities. Thinking like an engineer. Leave the dress up to courtiers. We have seen how trustworthy those are. As a backgrounder to the whole issue I would recommend Rosellini’s “The Rise of Louis XIV.”

    1. You are correct Nick. They just are so dominant in their product line. I think earlier it was all shirts and sweaters….

  6. It’s worth adding that Pachter was the first analyst to rate Facebook a buy, so clearly the hoodie couldn’t be *that* much of a problem.

    Why is it even necessary for Zuck to dress like a bank teller? So he can be as miserable as the Wall Street goons he’s pitching? That’s not why you become a billionaire.

  7. Zuck DOES dress to the occasion as he sees it fit. Remember when he was invited to a dinner of tech executives with President Obama? He put on his black suit while late Steve Jobs stuck to his signature turtleneck and jeans. We have also seen him wear a suit at a friend’s wedding before.

  8. If the hoodie wearing Zuck means he is immature and is not showing respect to the Investors, then if facebook makes money what are the investors gonna do? Not buy Facebook stock? These stupid chimps will not only buy the stock but also kiss the immature and hoodie wearing Zuck’s behind for all its worth…

  9. There’s no doubt that Zuckerberg built an incredible empire (more than a product) in Facebook. That said, I think that most people, for better or for worse, evolve in their clothes taste during the years. Even Steve Jobs didn’t always sport the turtleneck look (remember the butterfly ties?). But Mark’s lack of evolution in his fashion style might indicate he’s not taking enough time to evolve socially – mature – even as he’s revolutionizing the world with his social network.

  10. Made the same comment a while ago on Bloomberg – I agree!
    Yahoo! I think in that bottom drawer I had a patent on “writing about hoodies”.
    Have good weekend in or out of a hood….

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