iAMerican

73 thoughts on “iAMerican”

  1. We are lucky to have every dreamer like you who comes here. My great grandparents came for the same reason. That said, if I ever get asked to say the Pledge of Allegiance, I always substitute “Constitution” for “Flag”–it’s our best invention ever, after Jazz.

  2. Congratulations Om! Reminds me of my own journey and I know exactly what you mean by “read American magazines and knew where I belonged..”

    “Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free…”

  3. First of all congrats. I am one those dreamer who wish to come to America, lead a tech company, roam around at times square with a smile of satisfaction, be known, and more importantly to be that somebody. I am from Mumbai, India, I have no contacts, no relation, with anybody who could show me a way, a ray of hope, but I am struggling, striving to achieve my dreams 🙂 But I just like everyone(I think so) expect to get that ray of hope to take a right step.

  4. Reblogged this on Eideard and commented:
    Among the eclectic clutter of the three desks that consume much of the square footage of my study sits my Italian grandfather’s naturalization papers. The only document I have from the entry of my mother’s parents, of my father’s parents, into American citizenship. Back then, it only took Eduardo Trotta a couple of years to finish required classes and become a citizen. The same for his wife, Clara. But, it’s an important reminder to me that it took a great wrenching for a teenager to travel thousands of miles with his family to join a new culture, a new language – a new way of life.

    Om Malik deserves an enormous amount of credit for having the heart and spirit to make this journey. I wish him well in what lies ahead.

  5. this is actually the problem with America. this delusion that everyone believes they are on the verge of greatness when they are in reality on the verge of bankruptcy. Success in the USA is an elusion perpetuated by dept both finical and social. the so called American dream is vastly more achievable in countries where opportunity is much more evenly distributed like Norway or Sweden or even Canada. wake up USA

  6. Were it not for the immigrants from South Asian countries, I would not have had the ambitious, agressive and supportive (and very successful) dealer networks I had when running PC hardware and software companies in Canada. Om, you have expressed it nicely and the same opportunities apply in Canada.

  7. You expressed your experience with so much heart. It was only a couple of years ago that I found and read with tears in my eyes my great grandmother’s diary where she proudly said: “Today I am an American Lady.” It was so special then, and it is just as special now: the freedom to dream and make your dreams realities. Congratulations Om!

  8. Congrats Om! This is beautifully written expression of how so many of us immigrants feel. I have yet to cross the bridge to citizenship but at least I am no longer an “alien” but a legal permanent resident.

  9. Congrats OM.
    Your eloquence is beyond amazing.
    I’m proud to call you a fellow American.

    This country needs thousands more like you.
    Keep dreaming.
    Keep inspiring others to do the same.

  10. That’s wonderful news. It’s sometimes easy to forget how truly lucky we are to be part of this country. It’s not a perfect place (far from it), but the spirit of opportunity is one that we all need to cherish and nurture – and not just here – everywhere. Thanks for your heartfelt post.

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