1 Gbps for $20 a Month? That's Cheap Broadband!

20 thoughts on “1 Gbps for $20 a Month? That's Cheap Broadband!”

  1. Hi,

    I would take that speed with a grain of salt – I subscribed to HKBB (Hong Kong broadband) 100 Mbp/s for a while around those rates and the speed was crap, PCCW (Pacific Century CyberWorks) 100 Mbps/s is several times. Probably as important as the speed from your home to the ISP are the connections/capacities the ISPs have to the outside world. Disclaimer: I have no personal/financial connections with either of the companies.

    Mikko

  2. “24-month triple play contract”

    That’s lock-in!

    Seriously, who needs another phone number? Doesn’t everyone in Hong Kong already have a mobile device?

    1. This is indeed the case. I was drooling for a 100M connection awhile back, figuring it will still be 10x faster than my ADSL if I only get half as much as promised. When I connect to a US server, which is 90% of my usage, I get about 3M. I might as well get a 3G modem.

    2. >The advertised 1 Gbps speeds, with FibreHome1000, are only for access >within Hong Kong. Speeds for international Internet are much lower.

      That’s the same everywhere.

      In US FiOS is advertised as 40mbps. Good luck trying to get anywhere remotely close to that speed when you’re assessing an oversea server.

  3. Something else to keep in mind: I doubt HK negotiations between broadband companies and local government councils involve as much backscratching and graft as they do in the US. There’s a byzantine mess of local regulations and requirements that cost as much in legal and civic fees as the actual fiber plant, a barrier to entry that favors well-connected incumbents, and resulting in most places having at best 2 choices for home broadband.

  4. Hong Kong has a population density of 6480[8]/km2 (4th)
    16,576/sq mi. Austin, TX (as a typical American city) has a population density of 1,207.2/km2 (3,126.6/sq mi).

    You can reach a lot more customers with a lot less fiber cable in Hong Kong than you can in most of America. It the same reason cell phones are always smaller in Asia. It takes a larger antenna and larger batteries for a cell phone in most of America.

  5. 100MBps! But you have to sacrifice your freedom and be locked in.

    i admire the fact that the Asian countries have been pushing the speed barrier with Fiber Optic. The “spare capacity” is what’s being used to provide this FiOS-like service; Fiber optic capacity is dependent on the headend and the UE side! And as expected, only get full speed is far end optimized for the 100Mbps speeds. look out for 1Tbps coming soon!

    http://mythoughtsontechnologyandjamaica.blogspot.com/2011/04/verizon-nec-and-dawn-of-terabit-age.html

  6. 100MBps! But you have to sacrifice your freedom and be locked in.

    i admire the fact that the Asian countries have been pushing the speed barrier with Fiber Optic. The “spare capacity” is what’s being used to provide this FiOS-like service; Fiber optic capacity is dependent on the headend and the UE side! And as expected, only get full speed is far end optimized for the 100Mbps speeds. look out for 1Tbps coming soon!

    http://mythoughtsontechnologyandjamaica.blogspot.com/2011/04/verizon-nec-and-dawn-of-terabit-age.html

  7. if you live in Chattanooga, Tennessee, which will now offer 1Gbps connections across its entire service area—including the rural counties around the city—for $350

  8. “Netflix CEO Reed Hastings in an interview with GigaOM said that fiber is the key to future Internet innovation.”

    Only half the story: the other half is competition. Like most in the U.S., my market is served by two broadband providers: the phone and cable companies. To get a decent price on broadband with either you must bundle in services you don’t want or need.

    On further reflection, I think Hastings missed it entirely. True competition among broadband providers and more of them would bring faster speeds at lower prices. How they’d do it would be up to them.

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