Thanks to Video, 10G Fiber To The Home May Come Soon

3 thoughts on “Thanks to Video, 10G Fiber To The Home May Come Soon”

  1. Most agree that faster is better when it comes to broadband. Unfortunately, coming up with technologies for increased
    bandwidth is the easy part…

    How are we going to insure that every customer that wants the fastest available speeds will be able to get them regardless of geographic location?

    How are we going to insure that sufficient “last mile” completion exists to keep prices low and customer service high? In the U.S. most broadband customers are served by a duopoly, the phone and cable companies, that don’t compete directly on broadband, but on bundles with contract lock-ins instead.

  2. Verizon may very well some day deliver video over IP, but today it is using an analog (RF) form of video over a third wavelength. It’s interest in increasing speeds at this time, in other words, is not video, per se, but higher forms of high-speed Internet, and whatever other specialized services they have in the offing that require IP transport over the two wavelengths that are normally reserved for data. Granted, some of those specialized services in future (or even presently) may indeed be Web-based video formats, although here we may find that introducing content in the HSI element of the triple play could lead to some sticky neutrality issues, fwiw. Interesting article, in any event. Thanks.

    FAC

    ps – I would gladly stand corrected if it could be demonstrated that VZ is at the present time in fact delivering its commercial-grade video services over its FiOS network in the form of IP transport, and not using analog techniques, as I stated above.

  3. Om,

    Verizon may very well some day deliver video over IP, but TTBOMK today VZ is still using an analog (RF) form of video over a third wavelength, which is separate from the two wavelengths used for the IP transport of High-Speed Internet. I would gladly stand corrected on this if I’m mistaken.

    FAC

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