Apps Need Great Experiences, Not Tech

10 thoughts on “Apps Need Great Experiences, Not Tech”

  1. I really enjoyed reading this article because I completely agree that a huge part of what makes an app successful and gives it longevity is its user experience. Also, download numbers of an app don’t really say much either. In order to really analyze the successful of a mobile game, it’s important to take into account the user engagement and retention numbers. Millions of people can download a game, but not many will continue playing it three months down the road.

    Thanks for the article, it’s very good advice for up and coming developers.

  2. Nice article. I am new to the android system and market and can attest to having downloaded numerous apps only to delete them 30 minutes later because the game play and/or user experience is less than satisfactory. Quality over quantity any day. Thanks for the good read.

  3. I think it’s fascinating that all these different industries are moving in the same direction. It’s hardly news that everyone has loyalty cards, for example, but Starbucks, Amazon and videogame publishers are moving beyond that basic contact info relationship to engaging customers constantly. He’s not just advocating something for game companies, but for every company: the more engaged your customer, the more opportunities for monetization. It’s the digital version of a Super Walmart: Super Walmart, when you’re there, will wear you down if you’re there long enough, esp. with kids, and you end up buying all kinds of things ‘just in case’. Or with Starbucks, the longer they can keep you around, the more you’ll buy.

    With these games, you can feed the classic gaming addiction (‘just one more turn’ or ‘I’m almost beating him’) with add-on purchases.

    This is also the way MS grew their developer base for years, with freebies and conferences, etc. that kept people engaged and rewarded for that engagement. Foursquare’s mayor system is a more recent example – a game mechanic keeps people engaged and provides a mechanism for third parties to reach them.

    In comparison, and relevant to this article specifically, it’s rather sad how PSN, XBL and Nintendo look so traditional on their console business. They’re clearly pursuing motion sensing and 3d while their non-traditional competitors build self-reinforcing ecosystems. Google, Apple and Facebook could be positioned to completely displace them, apple and facebook are obviously farther along that path.

  4. Awesome products engage customers – This couldn’t be more true. Since our product is entirely free and we make money through advertising rather than sign ups, our success is dependent on users actively using engaged in the product – whereas other vendors can simply walk away at the point of sale. This means it has to be lightweight, intuitive, and fully functional.

    Helen Phung
    Practice Fusion

  5. It all depends on the degree to which Apple feels comfortable having it’s ever growing gaming community and its trappings occupying the same space as that of the larger network they have planned. It may take some time to figure out how prevent Facebook-like security foibles and community exploitability before it would be wise to launch an all-out grab for the attention of the most competitive gamers everywhere,

  6. It all depends on the degree to which Apple feels comfortable having the sizable iOS gaming community and its trappings occupy the same space as that of the larger network they have planned. It may take some time to figure out how prevent Facebook-like security foibles and community exploitability before it would be wise to launch an all-out grab for the attention of the most competitive gamers everywhere.

  7. lets be real. all neil young did was use kleiner money to roll up tech oriented (but not business oriented) developers. its easy to buy young (no pun intended) dumb developers for less than they are actually worth. neil failed many times before and would have again had it not been for raising a whopping $40m. I would not take his advice at all.

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