For ARM, It's Server Side Up

11 thoughts on “For ARM, It's Server Side Up”

  1. The only thing I can imagine with AgniLux is that the high-speed communication interface could be implemented with optics. Otherwise, nothing much has transpired, but this will definitely impact Google’s bottom-line positively if they manage to spend less for their servers in the massive data centers.

    You could also mention Apple’s acquisitions of PA Semi and Intrinsity as two ARM licensees.

      1. Sorry for the double posting, Om.

        No, unfortunately, I have been trying to find out more about AgniLux, but count the company as one of those very stealthy ones, and as soon as Google bought them out, the website became a skeleton, so it’s very difficult to know what is happening.

        The only thing I know for sure are these:
        1. AgniLux is an ARM licensee
        2. They have built upon the ARM IP to make chips for servers. At least they admitted that much. They also said they wouldn’t say more because it was quite radical
        3. Google spends a lot of time thinking about how to reduce their expenditure, including that of their servers. Google is always optimizing its business (they’re data-driven internally too for business decisions)
        4. One benefit of being an ARM licensee is that you can build on the IP but are free to design the high-speed communication interfaces.
        5. For Cortex A8, it proved challenging for some to break the 1GHz barrier (that’s what Intrinsity managed, and Qualcomm with the SnapDragon platform), so maybe one aspect could be a heavily improved GHz rating, but how radical can that be?
        6. Agni = Fire in Sanskrit & Lux = Light in Latin. So my premise is that they probably have a way of using light for the high-speed communication interfaces.

        I wish we could have more real information instead of being forced to speculate on the name!

        Om, I emailed you concerning your search for strategists a few weeks ago but didn’t get any reply. Should I send it again?

  2. The only thing I can imagine with AgniLux is that the high-speed communication interface could be implemented with optics. Otherwise, nothing much has transpired, but this will definitely impact Google’s bottom-line positively if they manage to spend less for their servers in the massive data centers.

    You could also mention Apple’s acquisitions of PA Semi and Intrinsity as two ARM licensees. Intrinsity worked to break the 1Ghz barrier.

  3. Low powered chips are good but they need to implement the x86_64 compatibility. Power consumption is only one part of game. To take advantage of power efficiency they also need to be available in smaller form factor e.g. 4 or 6 boxes in 1U space with shared electronic SMPS power strip consuming less than 150 VA overall including SSDs+RAM+Motherboards.

    We ran some numbers for ourselves, Intel Atom’s are fairly useless in a server farm for us in India and virtualization using dual Quadcore boxes is far more capital and power efficient. In India running anything but the latest greatest Xeon quadcores is simply too power in-efficient.

    1. x86_64? Only if you’re hell-bent on using Windows. On a server, you’re far better off running Linux.

      ARM is already several times more power efficient than Intel’s offering and they power most mobile devices, so the small form factor is already there.

      Intel is severely lagging them and has for some time.

      1. Josh,
        A vast majority of our customers run CentOS, there doesn’t seem to be an ARM port for that as yet, but Debian/Ubuntu which is a fairly large proportion of our customers seems to have good support for ARM architecture. I guess we’ll have it on our roadmap to try out and validate ARM architecture.

        -Tarun

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.