Google's Answer to Facebook Likes: +1

19 thoughts on “Google's Answer to Facebook Likes: +1”

  1. Just one small problem with all of this…almost no one but serious Gmail users has significant portions of their social graph inside of Google’s systems, the way they do on Facebook. That renders much of this a moot point. Agreed that it is baffling that it took them this long to roll this out.

    1. Google is pretty clever about sniffing out your social contacts on other networks. For instance, if you add your Twitter and Facebook links to your Google Profile then those contacts get folded into the mix.

      1. I’ve been using +1 and (+100 for that matter) for years now, not even sure anymore where it first started. It definitely has a whiff of tech-y insider baseball to it, not naturally a mainstream approach. But then, Google really doesn’t get social, so who’s surprised anymore…

  2. So the workflow is as follows:
    Search term(s)
    Results page
    Pick link
    Check page
    Go back to results page
    Find link
    +1 link

    Simple question(s).
    Since I’m going to do a lot of work for Google, what’s in it for me? Also if “friends” use slightly different search term(s) is it aggregated or is it an exact match only?
    Do I have to go in and delete +1’s after a year for products I don’t find relevant anymore?
    …..

  3. Following from Ronald, I don’t think many users are going to alter their workflow to include this new action.

    Generally, once I’ve found the information I’m searching for, I’m done with the search page. Finding the information means I can continue what I was doing, and my headspace is no longer concerned with search terms and results.

    Having the +1 as an overlay button would be better, since I could just push it and go. But it would be important to distinguish between “like this page” and “like this page in terms of the search I performed”, publishing that concept to my social graph would be difficult. If a post I write requires me to search for “Nazi memorabilia”, and think a page is a good fit to that search, I don’t necessarily want my social graph seeing “hey, tom thinks that page is great, you should check it out…”

    In some ways it would actually be better to have a -1 button, since if the page did not show me what I wanted I would be going back to the search page anyway, and then I’d press the button.

  4. The single most vapid thing on the internet is when using an online forum, someone replies to a post with a “+1” and adds absolute no new content/info/opinion.

    While I’m not sure the “like” button is a ton better, at least my brain doesn’t associate it with the millions of +1 posts that litter the internet daily. So, for whatever little it’s worth, I don’t understand how this passed muster at Google. There cannot be any thinking person on earth that associates the existing usage of +1 with anything positive.

  5. Like most I think this is a good thing (no matter what Google decides to term it as). But was there no information released on what precautions they are taking to make sure spammers don’t take advantage of this new feature?

    What’s to stop someone from hacking into Gmail accounts and +1’ing sites for keywords that they are trying to rank clients for?

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