Happy birthday Skype. In 9 years you changed telecom

15 thoughts on “Happy birthday Skype. In 9 years you changed telecom”

  1. Oh yes and don’t forget SMART-TV (mobile is sooo last year) . My pre-WWII parents who want to enjoy retirement at home love Skype, though you do not see it as selling feature in the U-mart pixel-focused TV sales depts hereabouts. And the reason is the UI …. GoogleTV3.142 is launching here but I doubt it will save Sony.

  2. I first became aware of Skype when I read an article in one of the mainstream business mags on founders Janus Friis and Niklas Zennström. They were living in Estonia at the time but the article didn’t identify their location beyond naming the country, because big telecom saw Skype’s free calling as a threat and wanted to serve Friis and Zennström with lawsuits to crush Skype.

  3. One of the problems with Skype as a company is that its a bit slow in evolving and as a result there have always been other players who are now capturing the market where Skype was dominant. Take for instance Viber is growing very fast and capturing a big chunk of Skype users. Similarly I have seen more meetings now being conducted on Google hangouts. Unless Skype improves some of its shortcomings significantly they may lose their lead.

    1. Zahid

      Couldn’t agree more. I have written in the past about why Skype is losing its sizzle and your arguments make it clear that it is facing a lot of challenge and has to reinvigorate the product. They have done nothing with GroupMe for example.

  4. What’s next for Skype: break beyond the walled garden and federate with other VoIP providers (via IP, not PSTN). Beyond collecting users, Skype wants to grow via traffic and interconnecting should satisfy that end.

  5. Hi,

    I have an idea that will change the auto industry and energy industry.

    Plug-in EVs with dual gasoline & natgas generators on-board to charge batteries as needed. #futuretech #energyindependence

    Please spread the world to Elon Musk so Tesla can save America and eventually the world.

  6. One big thing holding Skype pack was lack of over-arching enterprise services (e.g., consolidated billing, fraud support, centrally managed accounts). This should change with integration into the Microsoft ecosystem.

  7. Skype will continue to struggle to evolve the platform and expand the product. Why? They are limited to a client-side SDK. With Skype’s present architecture, federating with other networks (there is no precedent for this being successful in any of the IM players) is impossible. But that’s only part of the story.

    Similarly, Skype’s totally decentralized architecture makes it virtually impossible to expand the service offering — everything must be done in the client. Skype’s Product Team have promised a cloud API (once called ‘SkyHost’) since at least 2005, and have never actually delivered. And they don’t just need that to enable partners.. they need it in order to be able to build service-level features that don’t depend on the client.

    So while Skype has lots of room to grow, the thing holding them back is the very thing that made them successful. I wouldn’t look to them to do anything particularly innovative apart from deploying the SDK onto more and more platforms and expanding their device reach. Everything to the north of those efforts is both difficult and risky.

    1. isn’t that what IMO is doing (including skype and a few others)? so why would that be so hard to replicate that federation in a skype client? I think its more of a business strategy than technology which prevents this..

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