Samsung says get ready for 4G

9 thoughts on “Samsung says get ready for 4G”

  1. 4G is this decade’s PCS. It started out as a title for a service description in a standards body, but before the standards body gets through the service definition and standards-setting process and anyone has time to implement anything, it’ll be totally co-opted by operators as a marketing term. Sprint is already referring to their planned WiMAX network as “4G”; it’s only a matter of time before other wireless operators start referring to their newest technology (EV-DO Rev B, HSUPA, whatever) as “4G” so they’re not perceived as falling behind.

    There will be a brief hue and cry from the technical blogniscenti that they’re misusing the term “4G”, just as when AT&T Wireless introduced their “PCS” service in the mid-90s and there was a brief hue and cry in the technical community that it wasn’t “really” PCS. But over time this will die away as the operators actually start selling the service and competing on things like bandwidth, latency, and openness as opposed to what they call it.

  2. Unofficial definition of 4G:

    ITU defines 4G technology as a future wireless telecommunications technology allowing data transfer rates of 1Gbps at nomadic circumstances and 100Mbps at mobile circumstances. The spectrums for 4G technology will be decided at WRC (World Radiocommunication Conference) in October of 2007. The 4G mobile communications format is expected to become commercially available around 2010.

  3. With the above definition of 4G, Wimax doesn’t even come close. I’m interested in the technology behind Samsung’s high speeds. I noticed they are using an 8×8 MIMO, whatever that means.

  4. The dirty secret behind these 4G trials is how much spectrum you need to get those 100 Mbps mobile / 1 Gbps stationary speeds. Technologies are judged on their efficiency in terms of bps/Hz. CDMA-based 3G technologies tend to come in at < 1 bps/Hz. The most optimistic claims for WiMax are 4 bps/Hz and I am aware of no current gear that can do that in real-life. Even assuming your stationary system had an unheard efficiency of 10 bps/Hz that would mean you would need 100 MHz of spectrum to offer this service. That is pretty much the equivalent of the entire spectrum holdings of Verizon or Cingular in any given market, a good portion of which is already in use for mundane voice service.

  5. “The dirty secret behind these 4G trials is how much spectrum you need to get those 100 Mbps mobile / 1 Gbps stationary speeds.” And “That is pretty much the equivalent of the entire spectrum holdings of Verizon or Cingular in any given market..”

    Bravo Jesse for pointing this out. Spectrum is limited – nice techie trial to stir the PR pot. But come one – let’s look at reality here and now.

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