The truth about scoops

11 thoughts on “The truth about scoops”

  1. …”building contacts, establishing relationships and knowing my beat as best as humanly possible”…a lost art and rarely practiced by any reporters any more.

    1. I can think of at least three such individuals in my bailiwick. Of course, as I started to comment about why they’re so good – I realized the other side of the balance scale has dozens of tidy, obedient, unobtrusive drones. [/sigh]

  2. Great post, Om.

    The scoop gets points on the meme, but who writes the story? That makes me come back to gigaom, for stories.

    Om, don’t you think that beyond the “deliciousness” and adding to the reporter’s credo, the scoops don’t have meaning these days (keeping the linkage/SEO benefits aside)? Once the news is out, within hours there is much deeper analysis by others on the same.

  3. Om–Good commentary but for me the important point is that “scoops” as you and Salmon are defining them are merely jumping the gun on a story that a company is putting out anyway. They do not increase the sum total of human knowledge in any way. The “democratization of distribution” has resulted in a reduction in original content. Business journalism will only recover when publications figure out how to create content that people will pay for. “Jump the gun” scoops are just a macho competitive game played by the publications with no enduring value for the reader. I played too when I was at Bloomberg and won a few and lost quite a few (typically to the WSJ)–but I was much prouder of my scoops that mined new territory and were not spoon-fed by a PR person or an investment banker.

  4. Om–Good commentary but for me the important point is that “scoops” as you and Salmon are defining them are merely jumping the gun on a story that a company is putting out anyway. They do not increase the sum total of human knowledge in any way. The “democratization of distribution” has resulted in a reduction in original content. Business journalism will only recover when publications figure out how to create content that people will pay for. “Jump the gun” scoops are just a macho competitive game played by the publications with no enduring value for the reader. I played too when I was at Bloomberg and won a few and lost quite a few (typically to the WSJ)–but I was much prouder of my scoops that mined new territory and were not spoon-fed by a PR person or an investment banker.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.