What TiVo & Digg have in common?

6 thoughts on “What TiVo & Digg have in common?”

  1. TiVo continues to innovate but our research at Forrester shows that consumers only care about three things: record all episodes of a show, pause live TV, skip commercials easily. And all the PVRs do these just fine.

    But TiVo may yet become profitable based on its patents.

    Looking at the parallel, does Digg have any patents that are relevant in this race? Can they enforce them?

    Another key element — Web 2.0 companies tend to dominate categories due to network effects — it’s hard for the new guy to get traction when everybody’s over at digg (or YouTube, or MySpace, or del.icio.us, etc.)

  2. They key thing to remember is that Digg is a concept that can be very easily duplicated. And why shouldn’t it be copied in the masses. Companies are all about making money, not playing nice in the sandbox. If they see a good idea that can be easily exploited into their backyard then why not do it. The casulties usually end up being those first guys but that is the way of business and progress. Bravo to Yahoo, MSN, Dell, and Netscape…adcancement is a good thing.

  3. I’m not sure I agree with the statement that Slashdot is still thriving.. I used to use Slashdot exclusively until someone finally showed me what Digg was up to. Now for the most part whenever I go to Slashdot, most of the articles on the front page I recognize from being on Digg in the last few hours. It almost seems like it’s simply a time delayed version of Digg on some days.

    I used to really love going to Slashdot though.

  4. I am not sure TiVo and Digg are comparable. Digg’s value comes from the network of users bubbling up an important story. TiVo’s came from the content the consumer could store.

    Comcast controlled the content, which users had to get anyway and managed to capture TiVo’s base by reaching out to those consumers who were not yet using TiVo, and helping them use PVR without pain of installation (through its cable guys and installation charges).

    Not clear how Digg’s competitors can do that.

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