US States High On WiFi

8 thoughts on “US States High On WiFi”

  1. Roupen, I would imagine that what Sprint has to do is build a WiMax network that offers superior performance to most municipal wireless and 3G networks and then market it in such a way that this superiority is clear to its target audience. Meanwhile, they have to be careful not to cannibalize their own 3G network. So, in short, their game plan needs to be about 33% engineering and about 67% marketing.

  2. I would add that if Sprint knows what’s good for them they should be joining in this whole muni-wireless fandango and making a big splash with the licensed spectrum they can bring to the party. They have more 2.6 GHz spectrum than they know what to do with in most markets and rather than sit on it they should be making sure it gets put to some use. Broadband is one of those things where the more you have the more you want, as is wireless mobility. Partnering with everyone and anyone to get it out faster can only be to Sprint’s advantage. Maybe they have to be willing to sacrifice some of the longevity of their CDMA2000 network, which will always be an also ran to Verizon’s technilogically identical product, to do this. Still they have the chance to take the technilogical lead they’ve always craved in wireless, so they might as well go for it.

  3. Thank Jesse for the insight on the 3G angle (that’s always the other question – what will this do to 3G). My original question was about FON, the $5-router Wi-Fi social network guys http://www.fon.com. What do you think is their plan light of these munis Wi-Fi networks?

  4. Sorry Roupen, I thought you mean FON as in the old ticker symbol for Sprint. FON the WiFi company seems unlikely to ever be a serious presence in the US. I’m not convinced that this company is anything other than a scam (from an investment point of view) anyway.

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