Dell Admits, It Has No Rhythm

8 thoughts on “Dell Admits, It Has No Rhythm”

  1. Froget CE .. Dell seems a dated company as a whole (as of today) . Its plain vanilla products dont seem to help growth or cause any type of excitement. And Its not daddy jobs to blame. Even HP seems to produce better products today than Dell.

    I think Dell has to get back to producing good edgy products to get back its mojo.

  2. More than edgy – they need to produce solid dependable products that are well supported and stand for what dell used to mean for PC users. a solid, dependable brand. But trust me its not going to happen. its a commodity company in a commodity business – it just is squeezing blood out of a stone.

  3. Differentiation, differentiation, & more differentiation.
    Was there anything special about the dell mp3 players besides the (somewhat) low price?
    They could work with some of the Alienware designers to make a great quality & unique mp3 player or a cellphone!?
    Whatever is next, it can’t be like everyone else.

  4. @desparoz

    MS is not dell. While tomes can be written about ms ( and its product quality ). MS is more capable than dell when it comes to product engineering. M$ did produce the 360 (and some quality mice :)) with their hardware division. However taking on big daddy jobs in his fiefdom – well now thats another story. They may have done it b4. But as Om says dont count on it this time round.

  5. Was it “King Jobs” that finally forced Dell out, or “King BillG”? If Dell were already suffering, wouldn’t the Zune announcement have been the final blow?

    Dell (and everyone who isn’t Sony/Apple/Microsoft) has a problem of supply. They don’t just compete with the hardware iPod; in the mind of the consumer the iTunes music store is part of the equation. As big as Dell is, it would still be an enormous undertaking to launch a good music store. Current competition, while I’m sure are very nice, for whatever reasons aren’t really resonating with customers (save AllofMp3.com, tee hee).

    Let’s put it this way. You and I are on the board of a slightly unprofitable MP3 player company. While it was just Apple and Sony we had to really worry about, there was some hope that we could turn the corner with the right agreement with Yahoo! or Real or whomever. There was hope that we could come out with a great Video version, and strike the right deals to leap ahead in that market. After all, we had Microsoft and “Playsfersure” and a nice license for WMV, Sony couldn’t get there act together and Apple, why, there stuff was just so expensive. We could have our own quadrant for low cost supplier all to ourselves if we just stuck it out.

    But now what are you to do? It’s clear that Microsoft wants this to be their market, too. Zune as part of the PC/XBox/Phone Ecosystem kind of makes sense, not from a hardware standpoint, but from a “Microsoft wants to be a media company standpoint.”

    I’m really short on HP, Dell, and other traditional PC makers. The XBox and now Zune have signaled that Microsoft wants not only the OS in every hand and on every desk, and not just the revenue from video/game/television/movie/music sales, but now the hardware, too. And they are willing to pay to get it (look at the losses per unit on the XBox).

    Once the cellphone market starts to shake out – I look for Microsoft (if the government lets them) to spend some significant cash to own a Nokia or Motorola’s cellphone division.

  6. Alex, why would Nokia or Motorola sell their handset divisions? Both are profitable and fit well with the other stuff those companies make (the radio inside a phone are not much different from the radios inside a base-station). There is a reason Ericsson did a joint partnership with Sony, instead of just selling the division, and they weren’t doing as well as either Moto or Nokia.

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