Good-Bye TiVo, Hello Network DVRs?

17 thoughts on “Good-Bye TiVo, Hello Network DVRs?”

  1. I refer to your original statement: “The fact that you can’t rip the videos and share them with others makes this an ingenious solution for copyright owners, too”

    An Hollywood still does not get it…..

  2. @Doug Mohney… Mark Cuban… whose team hasn’t won in a while? Can’t drink his Kool Aid …. now. But I think if the service is free it makes sense. I really don’t want to buy TiVo or any device. I watch TV lightly so this is a good service. If they can make it accessible from internet for $2.99 it is still acceptable.

  3. Don’t forget Motorola and the Broadbus technology! But your point is right. People mistakenly believe that Network DVR is bad for the set-top makers, but it’s not when those set-top manufacturers also power the broadband networks and VOD services.

  4. I think the real killer app for network connected dvrs will be when they become customer enabling. You should be able to go back to the show from yesterday and stream it off your neighbors dvrs, and it should average their commercial skipping and automatically skip like they did. It could do collaborative filtering on your tv shows – people who liked heroes also watched how I met your mother.

  5. either the cable companies will do it or someone else will and then deliver it through the cableco’s broadband.

    this is happening with some overseas TV content (ie. content that’s licensed far more flexibly than in hollywood) .. check http://beta.vietnamlive.tv for an example. still in beta but they’ve a perfect example of a network DVR – they’ve recorded every single second of TV for over a year, recording several channels overseas so you can see what was on last week, last month or at 5:30am on the first tuesday of march, 2007. that’s the future of tv.

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