Google’s Jabber is Alive, works with iChat AV

32 thoughts on “Google’s Jabber is Alive, works with iChat AV”

  1. It seemed everyone was kicked off and receiving 405: Not Allowed errors. I was able to connect again by changing the Server to gmail.com instead of talk.google.com.

    Essentially my setup in gaim is:

    Screen Name: ashlux
    Server: gmail.com
    TLS: checked
    Port: 5222
    Connect Server: talk.google.com

    *cheers*

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  3. Every time Eric Schmidt and the rest of the Google gang go the bathroom, are we supposed to jump for joy? There’s nothing new to Jabber (its been around for many years now). I say this is a non-event so its time to take nap … Zzzzzzz

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  5. Not that impressed with Google Talk. With all the players in the space, wouldn’t have made sense to build in features that were at least in parity with what is out there or introduce features that are deemed more revolutionary?

    The voice over IM is nice and the interoperability is great, but it’s not going to make me switch from the client I use now. My friends are already tapped out and just see invites to these additional late services as spam.

  6. YACC (Yet Another Chat Client).

    1) Unless this has some compelling community-based feature beyond simple IM chat, why on earth is anyone going to use it? Apart from letting me use my GMail identity, what’s to be gained?

    2) Google is pretty naive if they think that Yahoo! et al will be interested in opening their networks for Google’s exploitation as a network-based equivalent of Trillian (which is what Jabber was originally intended to be) by federating IM identity. If YahOo! and MSN and AOL couldn’t agree to open their networks and federate to each other, why should they want to do the same to GoOgle, an even more threatening entity?

    3) This would be great in a world where Skype et al did not exist, but even then its value to Google’s core business is questionable.

    Disclaimer: Obviously this is just a beta, and not the endgame, but Google had better get a lot smarter about understanding the viral and community dynamics driving IM and VoIP and figuring out how they would monetize such a service in the long haul, otherwise this could be a very expensive expedition that gets them nowhere. Voice service are not the kind of thing you can “just throw out there”.

  7. The fact that Google created an IM/Voice client and the fact that is based on Jabber are the main things to take from this launch.
    They probably went to market earlier than they would like, but then again, why not let the market decide what it wants?
    Read the blogs, the wishlist has already been provided and Google can bring its resources to bear on putting them in the product.
    Integration with Desktop 2 is bound to come and perhaps with some of the other products Google has in it’s stable.
    Skype has lost momentum by developing video when it was clear that someone else was doing it. Delaying the introduction of Skype video would not have had much impact, and they could have focused on improving the basic platform. It could be a costly mistake.

  8. It’s unfortunate to hear Google Talk compared to other platforms, when there simply is no comparison. Google Talk uses _standards_ instead of proprietary procols, like the others. It uses Jabber for test, and Jingle for voice. With many IM clients already supporting Jabber, and a few in the process of adding Jingle support, this means you can have _choice_ of which client you want to use.

    Further, Google is in the process of getting their servers to be compatible with other XMPP servers, so that john_doe@talk.google.com can chat with jane_jones@jabber.org

    Google Talk has progress to be made, but it is fundmantally more robust than competing products. Jingle will quite likely beat out SIP (session initiation protocol) as the standard for VoIP, as it is easier to implement, and is better with firewalls.

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